Kramer’s SummitView™ Products Make Learning Easy for Aspen Elementary

October 18-2010

Kramer’s SummitView™ Products Make Learning Easy for Aspen Elementary
The next generation of technology has arrived at the Aspen Elementary School, where teachers and students are using high−tech electronics for lessons in math, language arts, science, and social studies. It’s not unusual to see a student clicking, dragging, illustrating, or presenting material in front of the class using whiteboard technology powered by the Kramer SummitView system.
According to David Fuentes, technology integrator at Aspen Elementary School, the Kramer SummitView systems helped create a multi−media learning environment that is user−friendly and reliable. “Technology works best when it’s invisible, and the Kramer system does that job,” Fuentes said. “Teachers love the ease−of−use and students are learning to use the technology, too.”
Aspen Elementary installed 37 SummitView units throughout the school — one in every classroom as well as the library, computer lab, auxiliary gym, and common areas. The systems include a compact SummitView BrainBox™ Processor/ Switcher connected to a video projector and interactive whiteboard. The BrainBox manages multiple images from various sources, including a computer, CD player, VHS player, and document camera. The images are projected on a 60−x 48−inch screen. Every room has a standard infrastructure, allowing teachers to use the same easy access to their information anywhere in the school. The systems also eliminate the time−wasting search for a video cart.
Kramer SummitView products, a series of simplified control products that are flexible and work together seamlessly, were designed specifically for the education, training, and small−group presentation markets. The SummitView equipment uses economical CAT5 twisted pair cable for signal transmission. The system can be controlled by a single K−Net™ cable between the SV−551 BrainBox and the wall controller. It inputs the video signals transmitted from the SummitView wall plates, converts them to the appropriate video signal, switches them, and sends them to a display device. Audio inputs are also switched in audio−follow−video mode, amplified at 10 watts per channel, and sent to a pair of speakers.
“Elementary schools are usually non−technical,” said Fuentes. “The Kramer product was chosen because of the simple−to−use components and the user−friendliness. Our teachers are not afraid to use it because they feel comfortable with the technology and they know it’s going to work.”
The Aspen Middle School has also added seven Kramer SummitView systems in its common areas. Aspen schools are teaching with technology and making learning easy — for students and teachers alike.